Measurement of Pollution Level with Particulate Matter in Babylon Concrete Plant and Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Hematological Profile of Plant Workers

  • Shaimaa H. Al–Dulaimi Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
  • Adel M. Rabee Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
Keywords: concrete dust, free radical production, Lipid peroxidation, oxidative damage

Abstract

The impact of exposure to different sizes of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5, PM7, and PM10) was evaluated in  Babylon concrete plant workers who had been exposed to concrete dust for at least 10 years.  The effects of  these particles on the hematological parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and  antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione peroxidase ) were examined. The results exhibited that the levels of PM2.5 and PM10 were higher than the acceptable limits approved by the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The blood parameters, namely white blood cells (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelets counts, demonstrated non-significant differences between workers exposed to the PM as compared to the control group. However, differentiated white blood cells count revealed a significant increase of  polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)  in exposed workers in comparison with the control group. However, both  MDA and glutathione peroxidase showed a highly significant increase in the workers ass compared to the control group. Thus, we may conclude that the concrete plant workers are exposed to a higher risk of oxidative stress that could lead to alterations in hematological parameters, enzymatic activities, and MDA level.

Published
2021-11-30
How to Cite
Al–Dulaimi, S. H., & Rabee, A. M. (2021). Measurement of Pollution Level with Particulate Matter in Babylon Concrete Plant and Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Hematological Profile of Plant Workers. Iraqi Journal of Science, 62(11), 3834-3841. https://doi.org/10.24996/ijs.2021.62.11.4
Section
Biology